Telephoto Flowers

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail
Dahlia - Andy Sears

Dahlia – ISO320 – 1/250sec f5.6 – 200mm

While most of the time I use my Sigma 105mm macro lens for garden photography, one of my lesser used telephoto lenses is the Nikon 55-200mm f4-5.6 Non-VR Bought second-hand this lens rarely sees the light of day, but on the occasions I have used it, I have been pleased with the results.

Using this lens at the 200mm end actually makes flower photography that much easier, giving me more room to manoeuvre. The depth of field is more forgiving than the macro lens allowing me to capture the full bloom while still separating it from the background. It is also lightweight and gives me the benefit of other focal lengths if needed.

The lens itself does have one major drawback on the autofocus front. It is slow, very slow. Although slow to focus, it does seem to do a good job (given time).

The different viewpoint offered by the telephoto lens is completely different from that of the macro lens. While detail matters I find myself looking at the framing much more closely with the better depth of field using the background flora proved beneficial to the end result.

The Nikon 55-200mm non-vr lens is available second-hand for under £70 and proves to be a real bargain, and offers more flexibility in not just flower photography but in general usage as well.

Pick up the Nikon 55-200mm from MPB

 

 

Dahlia Raindrops - Andy Sears

Dahlia Raindrops ISO500 – 1/200sec – f6.3 – 200mm

 

Rudbeckia - Andy Sears

Rudbeckia – ISO320 1/400sec f5.6 200mm

 

Cosmos - Andy Sears

Rudbeckia ISO 320 – 1/250sec – f8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready for Garden Photography

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

For 2016 I decided to put more of an effort into growing the plants and flower with photography in mind. Subject matter including Cosmos, Coreopsis,
Pots in GreenhouseOsteospermum and rudbeckia to name a few. Seeds sown and some plug plants ordered and the greenhouse from February full to the brim. The dark winter nights and cold weather took its time to pass but those seedlings and plant carried on growing.

With Spring came the Tulips, Daffodils, Snowdrops and Crocus and it was soon time to venture out in the garden with the camera to start capturing some of that colour, while those small plants in the greenhouse kept on grown.
garden-camBy the end of April things started to look a bit drab again, but the warmer weather hit, that late tulips bloomed and the grass got its first cut of the year and the garden now looks a lot tidier.

Into may those seedlings are now looking healthy and during mid may the first Cosmos start to bud and a few are moved out into the garden and they have survived the few colder nights. The third week of may see the Cosmos starting to flower, small flowers bu  t homegrown small flowers, Marigolds are flowering
Pink Cosmosand the blue of the forget me nots and filling the garden.

For the wildlife, this too is providing subject matter for garden photography, the pond is looking good, fish are healthy, and not bothered by the many birds visiting the waters edge for a drink and a splash, although the visit from a couple of ducks did stir things up a bit. The frogs have been, although the spawn and tadpoles did not fair well in the  cold and ice that came afterwards. Of the three nest boxes one pair of blue tits having taken up home are raising their young. Other bird visitors include Robins, Song Thrushes, Magpies, and Wrens.

Some extra space had been provided for some taller flowers and hopefully in the next few weeks the colour should start to really show, and with the flowers hopefully the butterfly’s, bees and other insects will make more visits to our Hertfordshire garden. Now the weeds are fighting back, the grass growing fast, shrubs and trees are in blossom and summer is almost here and hopefully during the summer months, there will be plenty of  opportunities for garden photography both home grown specimens and fauna visiting the garden.

 

Jordans Mill, Biggleswade, Bedfordshire.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

floralA heritage attraction, with a lot to offer. The mill itself, quality gardens, restaurant and cafe. A walk around the gardens provides many opportunities for photos, with an abundance of flowers, crops, plants.

The bees especially tend to love this place. The bright colours of the Rudbeckia can provide some great macro shots of the bees. The mill itself is an impressive old building and even the large vintage diesel engine in the courtyard add to the opportunities. The restaurant provide meals, snacks and hot drinks at a good quality and not bad value. Parking is free and ample.

View Jordans Mill Website

Jordans Mill – Google Maps